Chapter 3. Git & GitHub Project Setup

Project Initiator – Key Steps To Launch Git Project

Project Initiator – Key Steps To Launch Git Project
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We have already explained the key steps of Git & GitHub project setup for the three cases. From this page onwards, we are zooming into the project initiator's case. Here are the key points of each step. We'll explain each step on the following pages.

Step 1. Create a Git Local Repository

  • To record version history, you need to create a Local Repository in your project directory.
  • By running the git init command in your project directory, you can create a Local Repository.

Step 2. Develop code and commit it to the Git Local Repository

  • To create a version record, you need to make a commit. If you haven't committed your code yet, you cannot transfer your code to your GitHub Remote Repository.
  • In this chapter, we'll explain how to make the first commit with a brief explanation of the four basic key commands (git add, git commit, git status, git log).
  • There are some files or directories that you don't want to share with others. To exclude those files or directories, you can use the .gitignore file.

Step 3. Set up a GitHub Remote Repository

  • We already explained the initial settings of GitHub in the previous chapter. In the previous chapter, we only covered general settings. To use GitHub for a specific project, you need to create a Remote Repository for the project.
  • You can create a Remote Repository on the GitHub web platform.

Step 4. Share project documents in the GitHub Remote Repository

  • Before sharing project documents, you need to establish a link between remote and Local Repositories by registering a URL of the remote repository in the Local Repository. The command to establish the link is git remote add.
  • Once the Local Repository and the Remote Repository are linked, you can upload project documents by running the git push command.
  • To share the documents, you need to invite your project members to the Remote Repository and give them access to your Remote Repository.

We have already explained the key steps of Git & GitHub project setup for the three cases. From this page onwards, we are zooming into the project initiator's case. Here are the key points of each step. We'll explain each step on the following pages.

Step 1. Create a Git Local Repository

  • To record version history, you need to create a Local Repository in your project directory.
  • By running the git init command in your project directory, you can create a Local Repository.

Step 2. Develop code and commit it to the Git Local Repository

  • To create a version record, you need to make a commit. If you haven't committed your code yet, you cannot transfer your code to your GitHub Remote Repository.
  • In this chapter, we'll explain how to make the first commit with a brief explanation of the four basic key commands (git add, git commit, git status, git log).
  • There are some files or directories that you don't want to share with others. To exclude those files or directories, you can use the .gitignore file.

Step 3. Set up a GitHub Remote Repository

  • We already explained the initial settings of GitHub in the previous chapter. In the previous chapter, we only covered general settings. To use GitHub for a specific project, you need to create a Remote Repository for the project.
  • You can create a Remote Repository on the GitHub web platform.

Step 4. Share project documents in the GitHub Remote Repository

  • Before sharing project documents, you need to establish a link between remote and Local Repositories by registering a URL of the remote repository in the Local Repository. The command to establish the link is git remote add.
  • Once the Local Repository and the Remote Repository are linked, you can upload project documents by running the git push command.
  • To share the documents, you need to invite your project members to the Remote Repository and give them access to your Remote Repository.
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