Chapter 3. Technical SEO

What Is Schema in SEO? | Structured Data and Rich Results

What Is Schema in SEO? | Structured Data and Rich Results
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As people increasingly rely on search engines to find information, websites need to present their content in a way that search engines understand. You may have heard of schema but need to learn what schema is in SEO. The formal name is schema markup, which gives additional meanings to text data like HTML. By adding schema markup to your web page, SERPs may show rich results that can attract search engine users to visit your page.

Using schema markup requires correct technical understanding. In this learning session, we'll explore how to implement schema markup step by step.

What Is Schema in SEO?

Standard web pages are already designed to communicate with search engines effectively through HTML (HyperText Markup Language). For example, Headings (the <h1> to <h6> tags) define the heading hierarchy and clarify the essential topics on a page. The <header>, <nav>, <main>, and <footer> tags are used for standard sections with layout semantics. Additionally, text-level semantics tags like <em>, <strong>, and <code> provide semantic meaning about words and phrases rather than just visual styling.

Utilizing schema markup allows websites to label pages and enrich key details semantically, giving search engines deeper insights beyond basic HTML. Schema provides standard semantics for clearly denoting what types of content pages contain through machine-readable identifiers and attributes.

Why Schema is Important

With the massive amount of information online, search engines face the challenges of accurately organizing and presenting search results. Schema helps address this by allowing websites to semantically label their content in a way that search bots can easily understand.

As the website's content stays the same, schema markup may not have a direct impact on search rankings, but it helps search engines interpret the pages' intent and subject more accurately to determine their relevance to users’ intent.

How Schema is Used

Schema provides websites with a standard way to denote the type of information their pages contain. For example, labeling a blog post as an "Article" tells bots it is written content, not an "About" page. Categorizing products ensures they surface for shopping searches as Rich Results.

Schema Markup, Structured Data, and Rich Results

The concepts, Schema Markup, Structured Data, and Rich Results, are three sides of the same triangle. They are interconnected and work together to give results in a specific direction that aids SEO. Let's go in-depth on these three concepts to understand them better.

Schema Markup

Schema markup is a language used to describe webpages in a way that machines like search engines understand. The language involves selecting each page's most appropriate schema type (such as Article or Product) and tagging important attributes through structured data. Common elements tagged include the name, description, images, and other metadata.

Structured Data

Structured data is intertwined with schema and refers to the exact data marked and tagged by the schema language. The data comprises coded semantic tags and attributes that schema markup embeds within web pages. By applying schema annotations to organize and define the available data, websites can share structured key details about their content in a way that search engines and other online services can understand.

Rich Results

Rich results, on the other hand, are visual depictions that search engines display based on the data structured by schema for your web pages. By tags and attributes from schema markup, search engines can present your content in visually accurate depictions to match search intent. Some examples of visual depictions are knowledge panels highlighting key details about entities, interactive product carousels pulling prices and images directly into results, or thumbnail previews for videos without clicking through.

How To Implement Basic Schema Markup

While schema markup may sound complex, you can do some straightforward things to get started and see the benefits.

In this section, we'll cover the three commonly used schemas to provide basic information about your website to search engines: Website Schema, Organization Schema, and Breadcrumb Schema. Applying these foundational schemas is a painless way to provide more context without reworking your site architecture.

Website Schema

Website schema provides a simple way to give search engines metadata about your overall site, like the site name, description, and URL. This helps ensure your pages are correctly connected to your domain. Adding website schema takes pasting a simple code on your homepage to let bots know what site they're indexing.

Example of Website Structured Data
{
  "@context": "https://schema.org",
  "@type": "WebSite",
  "name": "Learning",
  "url": "https://www.learning.com/",
  "description": "A brief description of the website",
}
Example of Website Schema Markup Results on SERPs
Example of Website Schema Markup Results on SERPs

For more details, refer to this Google Search Central documentation - Provide a site name to Google Search.

Organization Schema

Organization schema allows you to annotate pages associated with a particular organization, like your business. Details like business name, logo, and founding year help search engines understand what your site is about at a high-level glance. Adding organization tags is simple whether you have a single-person operation or a huge company. Just paste the standard fields into your HTML code. Bots will immediately identify your pages as belonging to an established brand.

Example of Organization Structured Data
{
  "@context": "https://schema.org",
  "@type": "Organization",
  "name": "Example Company",
  "url": "https://www.example.com",
  "logo": "https://www.example.com/logo.png",
  "contactPoint": {
    "@type": "ContactPoint",
    "telephone": "+1-123-456-7890",
    "contactType": "customer service"
  },
  "address": {
    "@type": "PostalAddress",
    "streetAddress": "123 Main St",
    "addressLocality": "Anytown",
    "addressRegion": "CA",
    "postalCode": "12345",
    "addressCountry": "USA"
  }
}

When this schema is implemented correctly, search engines may pull the business name, logo, and other details into an enriched format like a knowledge panel.

Example of The Rich Result of Organization Schema Markup
Example of The Rich Result of Organization Schema Markup

For more details, refer to this Google Search Central documentation - Organization Structured data.

Breadcrumb Schema

Breadcrumb schemas provide navigation context by signaling the hierarchy of your internal site pages. While websites traditionally implement breadcrumb navigation using basic HTML tags, breadcrumb schema offers a standardized way for search engines to recognize and display a site's breadcrumb trails as rich results.

The key difference between HTML-based breadcrumbs and breadcrumb schema is that HTML breadcrumbs primarily serve as visual tools within websites. In contrast, the breadcrumb schema expands discoverability by replicating structured breadcrumb data search-wide.

Example of BreadcrumbList Structured Data
{
  "@context": "https://schema.org",
  "@type": "BreadcrumbList",
  "itemListElement": [
    {
      "@type": "ListItem",
      "position": 1,
      "name": "Home",
      "item": "https://www.example.com"
    },
    {
      "@type": "ListItem",
      "position": 2,
      "name": "Category",
      "item": "https://www.example.com/category"
    },
    {
      "@type": "ListItem",
      "position": 3,
      "name": "Subcategory",
      "item": "https://www.example.com/category/subcategory"
    },
    {
      "@type": "ListItem",
      "position": 4,
      "name": "Current Page",
      "item": "https://www.example.com/category/subcategory/page"
    }
  ]
}

By adding breadcrumb schema to pages, websites can see their intra-page navigation paths displayed in search results. For example, Google sometimes shows breadcrumb snippets that outline a page's entire directory structure in a tidy text format. This gives users immediate visibility of a page in a site's information architecture.

Example of The Rich Result of Breadcrumb Schema Markup
Example of The Rich Result of Breadcrumb Schema Markup

For more details, refer to this Google Search Central documentation - Breadcrumb (BreadcrumbList) structured data.

Schema Markup Tools and References

Now that the fundamentals of Schema have been covered, it's important to discuss the resources available for efficiently implementing schemas and testing your implementation. While manual coding of Schema markup works for simple sites, it scales poorly as content grows. Fortunately, there are helpful tools that make adding schemas across sites much more manageable.

Schema.org

As the central hub containing all entities, properties, and datatypes maintained via an open community process, Schema.org is the definitive structured data vocabulary reference.

Schema.org has become the preeminent industry standard for annotating webpages with structured data. As the most extensive shared vocabulary developed collaboratively by Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, and Yandex, over 10 million websites now implement Schema.org's entity types and property schemas.

Schema.org's in-depth pages provide the specifics needed, such as required property implementations and variations by encoding.

Schema.org Top Page

Schema Markup Validator Tool

The Schema Markup Validator is a freely available online tool provided by Schema.org to validate structured data implementations. Users can paste or enter a webpage URL for the validator to parse the schema markup for conformance with Schema.org specifications. It quickly identifies errors, missing types or properties, and invalid values and provides feedback to simplify debugging schema code. Schema Markup Validator UI Example

Structured Data Markup Helper (Google)

Google's free online Structured Data Markup Helper streamlines the process of annotating content by autogenerating valid schema code. Users can use an intuitive interface to describe webpage details like article author and publication date with simple parameters. Developers can copy the pre-validated structured data, for example, in the JSON-LD format, to paste directly into the site code. This tool eliminates tedious hand-coding errors.

Google’s Structured Data Markup Helper UI Example

Merkle Schema Markup Generator

The Merkle Schema Markup Generator can also create schema markup for various needs. Based on parameter inputs, the generator populates reusable JSON-LD snippets. Advanced features include exporting custom snippets for bulk template insertion sitewide. Its built-in validation prevents syntax issues that could impact rich results or browser compatibility.

Merkle Schema Markup Generator UI Example

Rich Results Test (Google)

Google's free and openly accessible Rich Results Test serves as a quality assurance tool for schemas. It comprehensively analyzes embedded structured data by pasting sample or live page URLs. Developers gain insights into any syntax errors or missing properties. Its specific error solutions can save time for debugging issues manually.

Google’s Rich Results Test UI Example

Frequently Used Schema Markup

So far, we've covered the basic schemas, but many other schema types exist. Here, we'll explain frequently used schema markup, including Article, Product, Course, and Video schema.

Article

By adding Article schema to news or blog articles, the publisher's articles can be presented in enriched formats like knowledge panels or article previews directly on search results pages. For example, in a prominently displayed box, Google may show the publication date, headline, and leading summary from an article schema implementation. Below is the example code.

Example of Article Structured Data
{
  "@context": "https://schema.org",
  "@type": "Article",
  "mainEntityOfPage": {
    "@type": "WebPage",
    "@id": "https://www.example.com/article"
  },
  "headline": "Example Article Headline",
  "image": "https://www.example.com/images/article.jpg",
  "datePublished": "2024-03-01T08:00:00-07:00",
  "dateModified": "2024-03-01T09:30:00-07:00",
  "author": {
    "@type": "Person",
    "name": "John Doe"
  },
  "publisher": {
    "@type": "Organization",
    "name": "Example Publisher",
    "logo": {
      "@type": "ImageObject",
      "url": "https://www.example.com/logo.png"
    }
  },
  "description": "This is a brief description of the example article content."
}

If the page with the schema is featured on SERPs, you may see rich results like the one below.

Example of The Rich Result of Article Schema Markup
Example of The Rich Result of Article Schema Markup

For more details, refer to this Google Search Central documentation - Article (Article, NewsArticle, BlogPosting) structured data.

Product

Adding Product schema to e-commerce pages can display product information in enhanced formats like knowledge panels or rich previews directly on SERPs. For example, Google may pull data from Product schema to render the product name, photo, and price directly in search results.

Example of Product Structured Data
{
  "@context": "https://schema.org",
  "@type": "Product",
  "name": "Example Product",
  "image": [
    "https://www.example.com/images/product1.jpg",
    "https://www.example.com/images/product2.jpg"
  ],
  "description": "This is a brief description of the example product.",
  "brand": {
    "@type": "Brand",
    "name": "Example Brand"
  },
  "offers": {
    "@type": "Offer",
    "priceCurrency": "USD",
    "price": "100.00",
    "availability": "https://schema.org/InStock"
  }
}

If the page with the schema is featured on SERPs, you may see rich results like the one below.

Example of The Rich Result of Product Schema Markup
Example of The Rich Result of Product Schema Markup

For more details, refer to this Google Search Central documentation - Product (Product, Review, Offer) structured data.

Course Info

By adding Course schema to course pages on educational websites, the course information can be presented in enriched formats like knowledge panels or info cards directly in search result pages.

Example of Course and CourseInstance Structured Data
{
  "@context": "https://schema.org",
  "@type": "Course",
  "name": "Introduction to Python Programming",
  "description": "This course provides an introduction to Python programming language, covering basic syntax, data structures, and control flow.",
  "provider": {
    "@type": "Organization",
    "name": "Example Academy"
  },
  "courseCode": "CS101",
  "hasCourseInstance": {
    "@type": "CourseInstance",
    "name": "Spring 2024",
    "startDate": "2024-03-01",
    "endDate": "2024-06-01"
  },
  "numberOfCredits": {
    "@type": "QuantitativeValue",
    "value": "3"
  },
  "educationalCredentialAwarded": "Certificate of Completion",
  "coursePrerequisites": {
    "@type": "EducationalOccupationalCredential",
    "name": "None"
  },
  "courseMode": "online",
  "courseWorkload": "3-5 hours per week",
  "courseLanguage": "English",
  "courseSubject": "Computer Science"
}

If the page with the schema is featured on SERPs, you may see rich results like the one below.

Example of The Rich Result of Course Info Schema Markup
Example of The Rich Result of Course Info Schema Markup

For more details, refer to this Google Search Central documentation - Course info (Course and CourseInstance) structured data.

Video

By adding Video schema to website video pages, videos can be presented in enhanced formats like embedded players or info snippets directly in search results.

Example of Video Structured Data
{
  "@context": "https://schema.org",
  "@type": "VideoObject",
  "name": "How to Make a Paper Airplane",
  "description": "Step-by-step instructions on how to fold a paper airplane.",
  "thumbnailUrl": "https://example.com/thumbnail.jpg",
  "uploadDate": "2024-03-01T08:00:00Z",
  "duration": "PT2M30S",
  "contentUrl": "https://example.com/video.mp4",
  "embedUrl": "https://example.com/embedded-video",
  "interactionCount": "2345"
}

If the page with the schema is featured on SERPs, you may see rich results like the one below.

Example of The Rich Result of Video Schema Markup
Example of The Rich Result of Video Schema Markup

For more details, refer to this Google Search Central documentation - Video (VideoObject, Clip, BroadcastEvent) structured data.

Conclusion

Adding structured data through schema markups is a simple way to elevate your content across search and web pages. This tutorial covered the basics of Schema markup implementation and tools and resources to help identify, generate, and test schemas.

Implementing schema markup may seem daunting at first. You should start with basic ones like website, organization, and breadcrumbs schema. Over time, expanding schemas to other content areas can further boost discoverability and user experience.


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As people increasingly rely on search engines to find information, websites need to present their content in a way that search engines understand. You may have heard of schema but need to learn what schema is in SEO. The formal name is schema markup, which gives additional meanings to text data like HTML. By adding schema markup to your web page, SERPs may show rich results that can attract search engine users to visit your page.

Using schema markup requires correct technical understanding. In this learning session, we'll explore how to implement schema markup step by step.

What Is Schema in SEO?

Standard web pages are already designed to communicate with search engines effectively through HTML (HyperText Markup Language). For example, Headings (the <h1> to <h6> tags) define the heading hierarchy and clarify the essential topics on a page. The <header>, <nav>, <main>, and <footer> tags are used for standard sections with layout semantics. Additionally, text-level semantics tags like <em>, <strong>, and <code> provide semantic meaning about words and phrases rather than just visual styling.

Utilizing schema markup allows websites to label pages and enrich key details semantically, giving search engines deeper insights beyond basic HTML. Schema provides standard semantics for clearly denoting what types of content pages contain through machine-readable identifiers and attributes.

Why Schema is Important

With the massive amount of information online, search engines face the challenges of accurately organizing and presenting search results. Schema helps address this by allowing websites to semantically label their content in a way that search bots can easily understand.

As the website's content stays the same, schema markup may not have a direct impact on search rankings, but it helps search engines interpret the pages' intent and subject more accurately to determine their relevance to users’ intent.

How Schema is Used

Schema provides websites with a standard way to denote the type of information their pages contain. For example, labeling a blog post as an "Article" tells bots it is written content, not an "About" page. Categorizing products ensures they surface for shopping searches as Rich Results.

Schema Markup, Structured Data, and Rich Results

The concepts, Schema Markup, Structured Data, and Rich Results, are three sides of the same triangle. They are interconnected and work together to give results in a specific direction that aids SEO. Let's go in-depth on these three concepts to understand them better.

Schema Markup

Schema markup is a language used to describe webpages in a way that machines like search engines understand. The language involves selecting each page's most appropriate schema type (such as Article or Product) and tagging important attributes through structured data. Common elements tagged include the name, description, images, and other metadata.

Structured Data

Structured data is intertwined with schema and refers to the exact data marked and tagged by the schema language. The data comprises coded semantic tags and attributes that schema markup embeds within web pages. By applying schema annotations to organize and define the available data, websites can share structured key details about their content in a way that search engines and other online services can understand.

Rich Results

Rich results, on the other hand, are visual depictions that search engines display based on the data structured by schema for your web pages. By tags and attributes from schema markup, search engines can present your content in visually accurate depictions to match search intent. Some examples of visual depictions are knowledge panels highlighting key details about entities, interactive product carousels pulling prices and images directly into results, or thumbnail previews for videos without clicking through.

How To Implement Basic Schema Markup

While schema markup may sound complex, you can do some straightforward things to get started and see the benefits.

In this section, we'll cover the three commonly used schemas to provide basic information about your website to search engines: Website Schema, Organization Schema, and Breadcrumb Schema. Applying these foundational schemas is a painless way to provide more context without reworking your site architecture.

Website Schema

Website schema provides a simple way to give search engines metadata about your overall site, like the site name, description, and URL. This helps ensure your pages are correctly connected to your domain. Adding website schema takes pasting a simple code on your homepage to let bots know what site they're indexing.

Example of Website Structured Data
{
  "@context": "https://schema.org",
  "@type": "WebSite",
  "name": "Learning",
  "url": "https://www.learning.com/",
  "description": "A brief description of the website",
}
Example of Website Schema Markup Results on SERPs
Example of Website Schema Markup Results on SERPs

For more details, refer to this Google Search Central documentation - Provide a site name to Google Search.

Organization Schema

Organization schema allows you to annotate pages associated with a particular organization, like your business. Details like business name, logo, and founding year help search engines understand what your site is about at a high-level glance. Adding organization tags is simple whether you have a single-person operation or a huge company. Just paste the standard fields into your HTML code. Bots will immediately identify your pages as belonging to an established brand.

Example of Organization Structured Data
{
  "@context": "https://schema.org",
  "@type": "Organization",
  "name": "Example Company",
  "url": "https://www.example.com",
  "logo": "https://www.example.com/logo.png",
  "contactPoint": {
    "@type": "ContactPoint",
    "telephone": "+1-123-456-7890",
    "contactType": "customer service"
  },
  "address": {
    "@type": "PostalAddress",
    "streetAddress": "123 Main St",
    "addressLocality": "Anytown",
    "addressRegion": "CA",
    "postalCode": "12345",
    "addressCountry": "USA"
  }
}

When this schema is implemented correctly, search engines may pull the business name, logo, and other details into an enriched format like a knowledge panel.

Example of The Rich Result of Organization Schema Markup
Example of The Rich Result of Organization Schema Markup

For more details, refer to this Google Search Central documentation - Organization Structured data.

Breadcrumb Schema

Breadcrumb schemas provide navigation context by signaling the hierarchy of your internal site pages. While websites traditionally implement breadcrumb navigation using basic HTML tags, breadcrumb schema offers a standardized way for search engines to recognize and display a site's breadcrumb trails as rich results.

The key difference between HTML-based breadcrumbs and breadcrumb schema is that HTML breadcrumbs primarily serve as visual tools within websites. In contrast, the breadcrumb schema expands discoverability by replicating structured breadcrumb data search-wide.

Example of BreadcrumbList Structured Data
{
  "@context": "https://schema.org",
  "@type": "BreadcrumbList",
  "itemListElement": [
    {
      "@type": "ListItem",
      "position": 1,
      "name": "Home",
      "item": "https://www.example.com"
    },
    {
      "@type": "ListItem",
      "position": 2,
      "name": "Category",
      "item": "https://www.example.com/category"
    },
    {
      "@type": "ListItem",
      "position": 3,
      "name": "Subcategory",
      "item": "https://www.example.com/category/subcategory"
    },
    {
      "@type": "ListItem",
      "position": 4,
      "name": "Current Page",
      "item": "https://www.example.com/category/subcategory/page"
    }
  ]
}

By adding breadcrumb schema to pages, websites can see their intra-page navigation paths displayed in search results. For example, Google sometimes shows breadcrumb snippets that outline a page's entire directory structure in a tidy text format. This gives users immediate visibility of a page in a site's information architecture.

Example of The Rich Result of Breadcrumb Schema Markup
Example of The Rich Result of Breadcrumb Schema Markup

For more details, refer to this Google Search Central documentation - Breadcrumb (BreadcrumbList) structured data.

Schema Markup Tools and References

Now that the fundamentals of Schema have been covered, it's important to discuss the resources available for efficiently implementing schemas and testing your implementation. While manual coding of Schema markup works for simple sites, it scales poorly as content grows. Fortunately, there are helpful tools that make adding schemas across sites much more manageable.

Schema.org

As the central hub containing all entities, properties, and datatypes maintained via an open community process, Schema.org is the definitive structured data vocabulary reference.

Schema.org has become the preeminent industry standard for annotating webpages with structured data. As the most extensive shared vocabulary developed collaboratively by Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, and Yandex, over 10 million websites now implement Schema.org's entity types and property schemas.

Schema.org's in-depth pages provide the specifics needed, such as required property implementations and variations by encoding.

Schema.org Top Page

Schema Markup Validator Tool

The Schema Markup Validator is a freely available online tool provided by Schema.org to validate structured data implementations. Users can paste or enter a webpage URL for the validator to parse the schema markup for conformance with Schema.org specifications. It quickly identifies errors, missing types or properties, and invalid values and provides feedback to simplify debugging schema code. Schema Markup Validator UI Example

Structured Data Markup Helper (Google)

Google's free online Structured Data Markup Helper streamlines the process of annotating content by autogenerating valid schema code. Users can use an intuitive interface to describe webpage details like article author and publication date with simple parameters. Developers can copy the pre-validated structured data, for example, in the JSON-LD format, to paste directly into the site code. This tool eliminates tedious hand-coding errors.

Google’s Structured Data Markup Helper UI Example

Merkle Schema Markup Generator

The Merkle Schema Markup Generator can also create schema markup for various needs. Based on parameter inputs, the generator populates reusable JSON-LD snippets. Advanced features include exporting custom snippets for bulk template insertion sitewide. Its built-in validation prevents syntax issues that could impact rich results or browser compatibility.

Merkle Schema Markup Generator UI Example

Rich Results Test (Google)

Google's free and openly accessible Rich Results Test serves as a quality assurance tool for schemas. It comprehensively analyzes embedded structured data by pasting sample or live page URLs. Developers gain insights into any syntax errors or missing properties. Its specific error solutions can save time for debugging issues manually.

Google’s Rich Results Test UI Example

Frequently Used Schema Markup

So far, we've covered the basic schemas, but many other schema types exist. Here, we'll explain frequently used schema markup, including Article, Product, Course, and Video schema.

Article

By adding Article schema to news or blog articles, the publisher's articles can be presented in enriched formats like knowledge panels or article previews directly on search results pages. For example, in a prominently displayed box, Google may show the publication date, headline, and leading summary from an article schema implementation. Below is the example code.

Example of Article Structured Data
{
  "@context": "https://schema.org",
  "@type": "Article",
  "mainEntityOfPage": {
    "@type": "WebPage",
    "@id": "https://www.example.com/article"
  },
  "headline": "Example Article Headline",
  "image": "https://www.example.com/images/article.jpg",
  "datePublished": "2024-03-01T08:00:00-07:00",
  "dateModified": "2024-03-01T09:30:00-07:00",
  "author": {
    "@type": "Person",
    "name": "John Doe"
  },
  "publisher": {
    "@type": "Organization",
    "name": "Example Publisher",
    "logo": {
      "@type": "ImageObject",
      "url": "https://www.example.com/logo.png"
    }
  },
  "description": "This is a brief description of the example article content."
}

If the page with the schema is featured on SERPs, you may see rich results like the one below.

Example of The Rich Result of Article Schema Markup
Example of The Rich Result of Article Schema Markup

For more details, refer to this Google Search Central documentation - Article (Article, NewsArticle, BlogPosting) structured data.

Product

Adding Product schema to e-commerce pages can display product information in enhanced formats like knowledge panels or rich previews directly on SERPs. For example, Google may pull data from Product schema to render the product name, photo, and price directly in search results.

Example of Product Structured Data
{
  "@context": "https://schema.org",
  "@type": "Product",
  "name": "Example Product",
  "image": [
    "https://www.example.com/images/product1.jpg",
    "https://www.example.com/images/product2.jpg"
  ],
  "description": "This is a brief description of the example product.",
  "brand": {
    "@type": "Brand",
    "name": "Example Brand"
  },
  "offers": {
    "@type": "Offer",
    "priceCurrency": "USD",
    "price": "100.00",
    "availability": "https://schema.org/InStock"
  }
}

If the page with the schema is featured on SERPs, you may see rich results like the one below.

Example of The Rich Result of Product Schema Markup
Example of The Rich Result of Product Schema Markup

For more details, refer to this Google Search Central documentation - Product (Product, Review, Offer) structured data.

Course Info

By adding Course schema to course pages on educational websites, the course information can be presented in enriched formats like knowledge panels or info cards directly in search result pages.

Example of Course and CourseInstance Structured Data
{
  "@context": "https://schema.org",
  "@type": "Course",
  "name": "Introduction to Python Programming",
  "description": "This course provides an introduction to Python programming language, covering basic syntax, data structures, and control flow.",
  "provider": {
    "@type": "Organization",
    "name": "Example Academy"
  },
  "courseCode": "CS101",
  "hasCourseInstance": {
    "@type": "CourseInstance",
    "name": "Spring 2024",
    "startDate": "2024-03-01",
    "endDate": "2024-06-01"
  },
  "numberOfCredits": {
    "@type": "QuantitativeValue",
    "value": "3"
  },
  "educationalCredentialAwarded": "Certificate of Completion",
  "coursePrerequisites": {
    "@type": "EducationalOccupationalCredential",
    "name": "None"
  },
  "courseMode": "online",
  "courseWorkload": "3-5 hours per week",
  "courseLanguage": "English",
  "courseSubject": "Computer Science"
}

If the page with the schema is featured on SERPs, you may see rich results like the one below.

Example of The Rich Result of Course Info Schema Markup
Example of The Rich Result of Course Info Schema Markup

For more details, refer to this Google Search Central documentation - Course info (Course and CourseInstance) structured data.

Video

By adding Video schema to website video pages, videos can be presented in enhanced formats like embedded players or info snippets directly in search results.

Example of Video Structured Data
{
  "@context": "https://schema.org",
  "@type": "VideoObject",
  "name": "How to Make a Paper Airplane",
  "description": "Step-by-step instructions on how to fold a paper airplane.",
  "thumbnailUrl": "https://example.com/thumbnail.jpg",
  "uploadDate": "2024-03-01T08:00:00Z",
  "duration": "PT2M30S",
  "contentUrl": "https://example.com/video.mp4",
  "embedUrl": "https://example.com/embedded-video",
  "interactionCount": "2345"
}

If the page with the schema is featured on SERPs, you may see rich results like the one below.

Example of The Rich Result of Video Schema Markup
Example of The Rich Result of Video Schema Markup

For more details, refer to this Google Search Central documentation - Video (VideoObject, Clip, BroadcastEvent) structured data.

Conclusion

Adding structured data through schema markups is a simple way to elevate your content across search and web pages. This tutorial covered the basics of Schema markup implementation and tools and resources to help identify, generate, and test schemas.

Implementing schema markup may seem daunting at first. You should start with basic ones like website, organization, and breadcrumbs schema. Over time, expanding schemas to other content areas can further boost discoverability and user experience.


You can also learn this topic on Kindle. ClickAmazonKindle.

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